Michael Jackson and 5 Other Things I Do Not Care About

I love the man’s music. I have deepest sympathies for the family, especially his kids. But that’s where it ends for me. Michael Jackson’s death is a personal matter for those close to him. I really wish the media and all his so-called ‘fans’ would butt out — like one of the characters in Gates of Heaven (one of my favorite movies) says, “Death is for the Living.”

People appear to want to draw attention to so many things that I believe should be low on the totem pole of attention.   We have such short lives, why is it that we want to spend large quantities of it worrying about what Paris Hilton and Brittney Spears are wearing (or not wearing)?   It all makes me want to be more concious about what matters and in turn, to be concious about what does not matter.   Here is my list of things I am conciously deciding not to worry about.

Domestic Poverty

Domestic poverty is off my list for two reasons:   1)  I’d rather focus my attention on World Poverty and 2) Domestic Poverty is really a symptom of other equity issues such as support for mental health, access to child care, and equity, especially for those with disabilities.   In my view, Canada is a country with tonnes of opportunity, and sufficient infrastructure to ensure that a population will not starve.   This does not mean I will not donate to organizations like Feed Nova Scotia, but it does mean that my ears will shut off if you are trying to lobby on a platform of poverty.

Preserving Heritage

The key to this statement is preserving heritage.   I think heritage is important, but because it represents a living, breathing entity – not because it is old and needs to be protected.    What I value about my elders is not that they old, but that they have a story to tell.   Some things are historically valuable and need to be preserved, sure – but certainly not everything, and absolutely not everything at the expense of a living, breathing city environment.   Librarians know all too well that an old rusty copy of War and Peace will do nothing to protect the value of Leo Tolstoy’s work.    A new, fresh, exciting-looking copy will have people reading and re-reading the book —  that’s the way you protect heritage, by helping people re-live the past.    That means you weed the old and replace it with new.

Privacy

Don’t get me wrong.  I would never spy or harrass others or want to be spied or harrassed.   Nor would I ever breach a confidentiality policy of any employer I may work for past, present or future.   But, I feel that the wholesale protection of privacy is costing us immensely in terms of service, and therefore I am just not going to pay much attention to this issue.   The lack of progress in a wide range of services in the name of privacy is astounding, and I’m sure that an audit of government would show a huge amount of time and money wasted to prevent that one case where someone discovers prematurely that their wife or husband wants a divorce, or that their young daughter or son is using birth control.   So much of this information is already available on the web if someone wants to look for it anyway – I do not think we can pretend we have private lives for much longer.

Funding for Elite Sports

OMG!   Another country might have more medals than us at the olympics!  How will the next Sydney Crosby thrive if we do not put ourselves into massive debt to provide special facilities for sports?   “Who cares?” is what I say.

What I see in a good amount of even semi-elite sports is not pretty.   The level of single-minded “win at all costs and blame the ref when you don’t” attitude in many sports is astounding.   The things that mattered to the originators of the Olympic Games concept have been pushed aside.   Remember words and phrases like “sportsmanship?” “sound mind, sound body?” and how sports was tied to education?   That seems all out the window in favor of money-making.   I don’t believe in sports anymore.  It used to be an opportunity to think about myself as a better person, now it is a crass illusion that parallels rather than promotes “success.”    There are exceptions, where sports figures are respected for both mind and body (Steve Nash comes to mind), but that’s the exception and not the rule in my view.

“We Need More Funding For. . .”

Just the general premise that we will only solve problem x if our governments make problem x a priority and provide it with funds is just not going to resonate strongly for me.   I believe in some of the work that John McKnight has done around asset-based community development, and agree with the general position that professionals invent problems and issues inside communities that they can solve and then use the community’s funds to solve those problems when the community had the ability to cope with those issues all along.

Here is a librarian example.  A librarian does a study on university students searching only to discover what is the most obvious thing:  university students are not the same as librarians!   That is, students do not automatically use boolean operators or advanced searches to find materials for their research.   Said librarian then uses this information to justify training sessions (ie. hire more librarians) so university students can become more like librarians.   The thing the librarian does not ponder is whether university students need to behave like librarians to be successful at their research; nor does he/she consider the impact of increase education costs (caused in part through funds spent on librarians) on that student’s capacity to learn how to research more effectively.

In short, I really dislike any movement  that blindly asks governments to give organizations more money.   I do not think professionals do it on purpose, but it is a really bad habit that I see over and over again.      Communities need resourcefulness from their not-for-profits, not funding.    And most importantly, communities need not-for-profits that shine the light on what communities already do well, so they can encourage these behaviors.

Well, that’s my list of things I am going to conciously not spend anymore attention on.     What is your list of non-issues in your view?    Am I unfairly representing any of these issues?

Doing a 15 Minute Presentation in 10 Easy Steps

Thanks Formication!Presentations are not easy to do well even if you are a designer or professional speaker.   Understanding your audience, having a catchy topic, being loud enough to be heard are all things that require practice.    Designers and professional speakers have the bonus of experience (and pre-set slides) on their side – you probably do not have any of the above.

After the Computers in Libraries conference, I got to see all kinds of styles of presentation.   There is one style that always stands out, no matter what.   I like to call it the “Scatter-Drone.”   That is the presentation that has 50 bullet points scattered on every slide with a long-winded drone of a voice wavering in the air saying something, but nobody really knows what because catatonia has already taken over.

 

There are simple things you can do to prevent being a total bomb in your presentation, though.   Here is one step-by-step process you can use to create a half-decent 15 minute presentation out of your typical Scatter-Drone.

What Do You Have to Say?

  1. Create 12 blank slides using your favorite presentation software.   
  2. The last slide should say “questions” or have a nice question mark graphic on it.
  3. The second slide should provide an agenda consisting of three sections.   Nice if you can offer a “promise” – something that you can assure will be worth taking away from your presentation.
  4. The third slide will offer three “big picture” points — you will repeat these things three times throughout your presentation.
  5. Fill in the rest of the slides with as many bullet points as you want.

How Will Your Audience Understand You?

 

  1. Print off your presentation as is.   Yes, it does stink right now – now you must fix it for your audience.
  2. Think of a single word or phrase that describes each slide (remember, each probably has 5-6 bullet points).   Go to Flickr’s Creative Commons and use that word or phrase to find a picture that will suit the bullet points you have on your slide.   Replace the bullet points with your nice picture.   As you put your pictures onto the slides, take a look at how other people do their presentations and adapt accordingly.   I appreciate that you are not a designer – but grab some ideas from people who are.
  3. Use the original presentation print-off (the one with all the bullet points) as your notes and the slide show with the pictures is what your audience will see.   Now you can just “read your slides” without anyone ever knowing that that’s what you are doing.

 

Feeling Confident and Prepared

 

  1. Start by acquainting yourself with the audience somehow.   Poll them.   Ask them what they expect from you.   Crack a joke to test their level of seriousness.   Maybe even throw them a bit, by offering an alternative presentation style.
  2. Give yourself an idea of where you are going to repeat your three key messages.    You should do this somewhere in the middle (slide 7 or 8) and again near the end (10 or 11).

 

That’s it.   A generic procedure for creating a half-decent presenation if you are not a designer or professional speaker.    It’s not too difficult to get a passing grade from your audience.   Remember, the audience *wants* you to present well and share your ideas in a meaningful way.   It just takes a bit of preparation, and some way of getting feedback from your audience.

Meet-ups and Fanboyisms

I just returned from my very first Third Tuesday New Brunswick event in Moncton.    I had alot of fun, met alot of interesting people and also got to meet Amber MacArthur, Jeff MacArthur and Christopher Dick.     Honestly, it great to meet web celebs who are willing to give you five minutes of their time to chat about whatever.   If you don’t know about these guys and/or CommandN, you oughta go check it out.   The product is good and they deserve the advertising revenue.

And in case you didn’t know, there are Third Tuesday Meetups in alot of other places as well.    Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver have Third Tuesday meetups as well.   Of course there is also a Third Tuesday copycat in Halifax called ForthThursday as well.     If you are a librarian interested in learning more about social media, you oughta show up for one of these events.    Already I have found the network has provided me with good number of ideas about how to serve the community better.

Halifax Rentals Go Viral

UPDATE:   I HAZ Embed Code now!

Killam Properties (the people who run Quinpool Tower) team up with Picnic Face ( the people behind the PowerThirst Video ) to bring you Landlord Lou, the only sane presence in a world full of murderous property thugs, annoying roomates and er, WTH?   a dancing panda?   (I’m not mentioning his siberian white tiger girlfriend.)

Yes, of course I know its an ad.    But I’m happy to see a little viral action coming out of my hometown.   And, I’ll let you sell me something as long as you entertain me first.  🙂

Dawn of the Dewey: What About A New Standard?

Tim Spalding of Library Thing has initiated an idea for an open source, crowd created replacement for the Dewey Decimal System called OSC.   On the whole, I am for starting anything.   I think entrepreneurialism like this is a good thing.   Competition of any kind cannot hurt the process of information organization — it makes everyone stronger, smarter and more productive.  There’s more discussion about it by Tim from this Wednesday’s Uncontrolled Vocabulary.

I do get a little up in arms when I hear pretentious snark about someone’s idea.    More of it was thought to appear on librarian.net, although it seems it may not have been snark after all?

Having skimmed over the forum, one of the concerns I have at the outset is that the ideas appear to be mimicing, rather than replacing the DDC.     I would like to see people using their minds more about this issue.   Mimicing is a definite no-no from an aesthetic point of view, and it makes me question what the point of such a replacement in the first place?   I say if you are going to do something new, make it new.   Make it noticeably 2008, rather than an updated 18-hundred-whatever.

The other issue I have is that thinking about book order in the abstract is quite different from action thinking.   Considering that this replacement will be largely about placing books on a relative shelf order, I think we should be developing that standard while actually shelving books.   So, here is my idea:

  • Go to your local public library’s catalogue and using any random selection process of your choice, place a hold on 20 or more books.
  • Put those books in a shelf order, that makes sense to you.
  • Try an alternative shelf-order.
  • One more alternative shelf-order.
  • Post those titles and shelf orders to the Library Thing forum on this issue
  • Explain how you came to these shelf orders, which one you liked the best and why.

Or you can do something else similar.   The broad point i want to make is that, if this thing is going to replace DDS, then it ought to be based on some sort of new foundations, hopefully considering not only what the user thinks, but how the user will eventually use the system.  The only way to get at how people use something is through action.

All in all, I love this idea and kudos to Tim Spalding for proposing it.    And by the way, he is looking for a leader for this project — someone who will facilitate the process without dominating it.   You got the guts?  Go for it!